Activating Mt Cotton VK4/SE-115

This was one summit I have wanted to activate for quite some time, partly due its proximity and partly due to the excellent Sirromet Winery nearby. So when Sunday 30 April dawned with beautiful clear skies, I knew it was time. My wife decided this would also make an excellent day out.

The drive to the base of the summit took about 40 minutes. We parked at the bottom in a designated car park and headed for the gate that heralded the beginning of the path up.

This is the beginning of the path up to the summit.

Fortunately the path up is sealed, which made walking up easier, even though it was rather steep at times.

It took us 22 minutes to walk up to the summit.

Once at the top it was simply a matter of seeking out the best operating position. This was important as there are a couple of communication towers there and I didn’t want interference.

The going was tough at times.

I found a suitable spot among a pile of rocks, so I erected the long wire antenna on my squid pole, and connected it up to my Elecraft KX1. It tuned up beautifully on 20m and 40m. For power I use six internal AA 1.5v batteries that give me between 1 and 2 watts output to play with.

It was quite comfortable, really.

I put out my first call on 20m and within seconds was answered by VK3CAT in Victoria. Not bad for 2 watts. I then switched to 40m (only 1 watt) and worked VK2NP, VK2BJT and VK4TJ.

I find the Pico Paddle a wonderful device to use with the KX1. It is magnetically held in place on the tin plate on my home brewed QSO board.

That was sufficient for the activation to count, so it was time to pack up and head off down and to lunch at Sirromet.

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Activating Mt Warning, VK2/NR-001

January 11, 2017 had hardly got going when my son Garrett, his partner Vicky and I set out to activate Mt Warning, an ancient volcano that is said to be over 20 million years old. For this expedition, we hired accommodation in Byron Bay as this would cut down travelling time to the mountain. You see, we wanted to watch the sun rise from the summit.

Mt Warning as seen from Byron Bay.

Mt Warning as seen from Byron Bay.

We packed the car and headed for the base of the mountain at 2.45 am, arriving there at 4.11 am. I was a little surprised to see that we weren’t the only ones with that idea; there were around ten cars parked in the car park already!

An information board advised us that the hike would take between 4 and 6 hours to cover the 9 km track.

We also noticed that right from the start the going was uphill. I could feel this was going to be a most challenging activation. What was beginning to concern me was that I might have bitten off more than I could chew. I mean, Garrett is a professional sportsman and Vicky is an ultra-marathon and Iron Man competitor while I am a newly retired ‘senior’. Was I in the right company or what? At least there were four helicopter landing platforms, which gave some sort of comfort.

The first of four helicopter landing platforms.

The first of four helicopter landing platforms.

Sunrise was around 6 am, but we weren’t at the summit to view it. However, we were close enough and boy, was it spectacular!

This made the climb worthwhile.

This made the climb worthwhile.

We arrived at the hardest part of the climb; this involves a very challenging rock climb that was billed as a grade 5 climb – the hardest in the book. A heavy chain provides essential support all the way up; this part took us a good 20 minutes to complete.

This is a grade 5 climb.

This is a grade 5 climb.

After resting for a few minutes and taking in the view, I erected my squidpole and long wire antenna.

This antenna is prefect for my Elecraft KX1.

This antenna is prefect for my Elecraft KX1.

Then I began calling CQ. After my first contact (with ZL1BZY) the ants appeared. They seemed as fascinated with what was going on as the other mountain climbers.

Ants on my 7 a/h gel cell.

Ants on my 7 a/h gel cell.

I also found out that their bites were painful!

It's hard flicking them away while trying to operate the paddle.

My new QSO board in use. There are some more mods I need to make.

After making six contacts, it was time to pack up and head back down. The weather forecast was for heavy rain and we didn’t fancy the prospect of tackling the chains in the wet.

We passed some massive trees on the way down.

We passed some massive trees on the way down.

We arrived back at the base of the mountain at 10.24 am and headed for a wonderful cafe in the heart of the Wollumbin National Park for breakfast.

This was the hardest activation I have done so far. I still wonder how an old fella who passed us on the way up did so bare foot. He said he could feel the rocks better that way!

This activation bought home to me the absolute necessity of minimizing weight as much as possible. My back pack weighed in at a hefty 8 kg, and that was without our water bottles. The biggest culprit here was my gel cell, which is far too heavy. I think next time I will use six internal AA cells and sacrifice 3 Watts of power. Either that or I will invest in a  LiPo battery pack. I also took up items that I never used, like binoculars.

Having done most of my climbing in the ACT so far, I was inappropriately dressed. All other climbers were in shorts and singlets while I wore long pants and a long sleeve shirt; far too hot.

So there are always lessons to be learned, aren’t there?

SOTA Activation of Mt Tamborine, VK4/SE-059

Mt Tamborine is an iconic Aussie tourist destination situated in the Gold Coast hinterland. The summit is right in the middle of a suburb but fortunately there is a good lookout in the Tamborine National Park very nearby.

This activation was a good chance for me to try out my new Pico Paddle with my Elecraft KX1.

I had ordered a Pico plate as well; this is a thin plated piece of metal with self-adhesive tabs on the back. The idea is for this to stick onto whatever surface you want to mount the paddle on. I decided to mount mine on my newly made QSO board.

After erecting my squid pole to secure the end of a 24 foot long wire to, I ran out the two counterpoises and connected up the rig.

Installing the long wire antenna.

Installing the long wire antenna.

Then I began calling on 20m.

This was my first attempt at using my new QSO board, with the Pico Paddle mounted in place.

This was my first attempt at using my new QSO board, with the Pico Paddle mounted in place.

It wasn’t long before I realised the Pico plate was simply not up to the job; the paddle began moving around. The magnets were just not strong enough, even though my sending was gentle. I would need to fix this.

Anyway, the bands were in bad shape and I only managed three contacts all morning. Those were with ZL1BYQ and VK7CW on 20m, and VK4EKA on 40m. I also tried SSB with my Yaesu FT-817 on both bands but to no avail.

Back home I began modifying my QSO board.

The Pico Paddle with the Pico plate in place on the board.

The Pico Paddle with the Pico plate in place on the board.

A quick email to Palm Radio in Germany brought the suggestion that I should try using a metal plate instead of the Pico plate, so I raided my workshop and cut a piece of plate to fit. This was then hot glued into place.

The Pico Paddle now attaches itself really firmly to my board, thanks to the metal plate.

The Pico Paddle now attaches itself really firmly to my board, thanks to the metal plate.

Now to head back to Mt Tamborine some day to give it a go. Perhaps then I will manage four contacts and score the two points that are on offer.

A clipboard for SOTA

One of the challenges I have had to contend with while operating in hostile environments up on a distant summit has been logistical or organisational in nature. You know, trying to deal with various pieces of equipment, pen and notebook, wires, seating arrangements etc, all while trying to decipher morse code, taking notes and ensuring that everything works as intended.

This takes more than one set of hands to do properly.

While sitting on my chair up on The Knobby recently (VK4/SE-097) it occurred to me that the time had come to construct a simple clip board upon which I could mount my Elecraft KX1, my log sheets and anything else I might need. So I headed back down once the activation was completed and rushed straight to my workshop, where I selected some suitable pieces of timber for the job.

This is what I came up with:

sota-clipboard

SOTA Activation of Mt Mundoonen

Saturday 13 February 2016 dawned hot, with clear skies; a great day to head for the hills and activate another summit.

Tony, VK1VIC , collected me from outside my apartment in Canberra at 9am sharp. It was only a 35 minute drive into New South Wales and up Mt Mundoonen (VK2/ST-053). This time I was going to rely on my Elecraft KX1 at 1W and my Buddistick vertical antenna. Tony would be using his new Elecraft KX3 (the big brother to the KX1) and a trap dipole antenna supported by a squid pole.

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Tony VK1VIC at his operating position

Tony is still getting used to using CW and loved the chance of working some true “gentlemen” who gave him lots of encouragement. He has also recently acquired a Palm Paddle, which is an excellent piece of gear.

Mt Mundoonen (5)

Boy, was it hot up on this summit!

My operating position was far enough away from Tony so as to minimise interference as we would both be operating on the 40m band. The only nice and flat piece of ground I could find happened to be very close to a huge wire dipole that I believe is used for aircraft business.

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I wish I had one like this at my QTH!

All in all, we had a very successful day. I added nine contacts to my log, including two Summit-to-Summit contacts with Andrew, VK1AD, who activated VK2/SW-034 and VK2/SW-027.

SOTA action: three 8-pointers in a day

Saturday 16th January 2016 was always going to be a BIG day for SOTA in VK1; Tony (VK1VIC), Adan (VK1FJAW, Andrew (VK1DA) and I (Grant VK4JAZ) set out bright and early for New South Wales, intent on activating three ‘bad boy’ summits.

First on our agenda was Webbs Ridge (VK2/ST-005), Dingi Dingi (VK2/ST-004) and Baldy Range (VK2/ST-008).

We were well equipped for the expedition. Transport was by four-wheel-drive as this, we knew, was serious four-wheel-drive country.

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My set up was all rather standard, and chaotic. Rigs included my FT-817, Hendricks BLT ATU, 7ah battery and 5A solar panel, a CW Touchkeyer and a Boafeng GT-3TP Mk111 hand held. I had decided on using my Elecraft KX1 on Dingi Dingi.

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The first summit we activated was Webbs Ridge, which saw all of us working many stations who were keen to add 8 points to their scores. We also worked many Summit-to-Summits.

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Tony (left) and Adan in action.

Next up was Dingi Dingi, which was more challenging to get to; we had to make our way through dense bush and thick undergrowth for about 600m.

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The going was interesting enough; we came across a few Wombat holes, which could be dangerous if you inadvertently stood in one. They weren’t easy to spot in the dense undergrowth.

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The size of these Wombat holes is deceptive. These are large animals.

The trees, too, proved interesting.

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We weren’t sure what this was on the trunk of this tree.

By the time we arrived at Baldy Range, it was well into the afternoon and chasers were decidedly more difficult to work. However, we all were able to activate this summit by making the required number of contacts.

All that was left was for us to pack up our gear and head for home.

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From left, Tony (VK1VIC), Andrew (VK1DA) and Grant (VK4JAZ)

Mt Majura; another VK1 activation

On Thursday 9 December Andrew (VK1AD) and I set out after work to activate Mt Majura (VK1/AC-034). Being only some 5.9km from my apartment, this summit was a comfortable evening expedition, thanks to daylight saving time.

Don’t be misled by the one point this summit is worth. Although it is only some 890m high, when you climb it is sure feels ten times that.

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That’s where we were heading.

 

It always amazes me what you come across when you get out of the shack and into the great outdoors. Andrew heard this scuffling sound in the grass and spotted a Shingleback Lizard, also know as a Stumpy-tailed Lizard.

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When the lizard is threatened, it turns towards the threat, opens its mouth wide and sticks out its blue tongue, which contrasts with the bright pink mouth. 

Once we arrived on the summit, we wasted no time setting up and getting on air. It would only be an hour or so before we needed to head back down as we didn’t want to be on the mountain in the dark.

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As always, I erected my Buddistick antenna and connected up my Elecraft KX1 transceiver. Power output was 1W

Andrew was concentrating on the 10m and 6m bands that are part of the SOTA challenge.

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Andrew set up his station near the trig beacon

I was more than happy with the ten CW contacts I made on 20m and 40m.

On the way down we came across some of the locals, who seemed interested in what we were doing there.

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