First Australian SOTA and VKFF DMR contact?

After weeks of poor weather in Queensland, Saturday 10th November dawned bright, sunny and hot. This would be the perfect day to head for the hills and make a DMR contact, in simplex, on Talk Group 99 in Time Slot 1.

At first, my plan was to climb to the summit of Mt Beerwah (VK4/SE-057) but on reading a few blogs about the climb and what it entailed, I decided that discretion would certainly be the better part of valour on my part as I am not as young as I’d like to be. Much of the way up is undertaken on all fours, so the bloggers said; I didn’t want to chance becoming a helicopter Medivac casualty. Moving about on all fours isn’t advisable especially if you have gear that includes a rather long and unwieldy ‘squid pole’ to contend with.

So I set my sights a little further up the Sunshine Coast and settled on Mt Coolum (VK4/SE-114). And to make things even better, it falls within the Mt Coolum National Park (VKFF-0344).

My gear for this activation was my Elecraft KX1 (with six internal AA cells) and 24 ft long wire antenna with two counter-poises of 16ft and 32ft respectively. For seating arrangements I took along my Helinox Chair One.

Mt Coolum is the second largest solid rock mountain in Australia; the largest is Uluru (previously known as Ayers Rock) in the Northern Territory. This fact alone made it fitting that I should climb it as I had visited Uluru in July.

The way up to the summit is very steep but the path is excellent, consisting of suitably arranged rocks that act as steps. It is a very popular outdoor venue with the locals and as a result the way up and down is very busy.

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The was a constant stream of people making their way to the summit.

As soon as I arrived at the top I put out a call to Greg, VK4MHC, on DMR simplex with my CS750 hand held radio. He replied and sounded as if he were a few feet away, so strong and clear was the audio. And considering he happened to be at a local resort some 2km away, the quality of the signal was nothing less than astounding.

The simplex calling frequency in Australia is 439.200 MHz.

This I believe is the first time DMR has been used as a mode for SOTA and WWFF in Australia. (Our local VKFF representative in VK4 later told me after I had submitted my log that he was unable to process the DMR QSO as the system wouldn’t accept a Digital Voice call even though it’s listed as an accepted mode. He has progressed the issue further up the line, something that tells me it hasn’t been encountered before.)

We then proceeded to talk on 2m and 70cm FM; I used my Yaesu FT-70D and he used his Yaesu FT-818.

I then looked for a suitable spot out of the way of curious onlookers to set up my HF station. That spot turned out to be right in the middle of a thicket of sharp bushes that I cleared just enough for the chair.

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Keeping out of the sun was the name of the game.

Once my gear was in place, I settled down into my chair and uploaded a spot to SOTA Spotter. Who said the bands were dead? Here’s the list of the stations I worked using only 2W.

VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 22:39 VK4/SE-114 433MHz DV VK4MHC. (First DMR call in VK?)
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 22:43 VK4/SE-114 144MHz FM VK4MHC
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 22:44 VK4/SE-114 433MHz FM VK4MHC
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:26 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW VK7CW
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:30 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW VK1MCW
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:35 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW VK3CAT/P
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:37 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW VK3ARH
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:40 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW VK3IL/P
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:43 VK4/SE-114 14MHz CW ZL3GA
VK4JAZ 09/11/2018 23:53 VK4/SE-114 7MHz CW VK2IO/P

In addition, VK3CAT, VK3ARH and VK3IL were also summit activations.

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At leas the view was good amongst the prickly shrubs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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First C4FM SOTA contacts in Queensland

Going through the Activator Roll of Honour results for QLD recently, I noticed that there were no results for Digital Voice. Checking the state of play for the other states, I saw that the Australian Capital Territory and Victoria had one each.

It was time to put that right, so on Saturday 23rd June, I headed out for Mt Cotton (VK4/SE-115) with nothing more than my Yaesu FT-70DR hand held radio.

I had activated this summit more than a year previously, so if I logged at least four qso’s, it would count as another activation and my tally would increase by one point.

The climb up to the summit was uneventful and I headed to a clearing that featured a rather tatty picnic table and a good view.

I set the radio’s frequency to 147.400, the calling frequency for digital modes, and the mode to DN (Normal Digital Mode).

I had pre-arranged with Wal, VK4CBW, to listen out for me on simplex. His was the first contact I made. The distance between us was 26.33 Km (16.456 miles) and his Yaesu FT-2DR connected to a beam antenna sounded excellent. I ran a few quick tests too, to see what difference it would make to the signal if I placed my radio flat on the ground while he spoke. It made absolutely none!

Trying to get more height when calling CQ.

I am well used to using FM simplex on summits and noticed immediately that with C4FM there was no background hiss at all. The audio was as perfect as can be, very similar to that of a mobile phone.

I then had a long qso with George, VK4HGT, followed by Phil, VK4MOT and Bob VK4YA. All contacts were remarkable in that the audio was perfect. I think C4FM is far superior to FM analogue and it’s a mode I’ll be using more often in future.