First portable operation with the Packer 6m amplifier

I decided to take the bull by the horns and activate a SOTA summit on 6m only, using my newly-built Packer 6m 30W linear amplifier. The summit I chose was Tamborine Mountain, VK4/SE-059.

My rig this time was the Yaesu FT-817 and the antenna was a homebrew 6m dipole, strung up as a sloper.

The rig connected to the amp and the LDG antenna tuner. The battery is a 7a/h gel cell. The power cords are routed through a SotaBeams 4-Way distribution box.

As soon as I put out my first call, the game was on. In the space of a short 30 minutes I had made 15 contacts. Wonderful.

The action came thick and fast and the view was excellent.

One aim of the activation was to test the amp, especially how long the battery would last as it draws around 6A.

At the start of the activation my battery had 12.58V, and at the end, 12.49V. That’s pretty incredible, especially seeing I was operating almost continuously. Input power from the radio was 1W and output 30W.

Another test I carried out (with Peter VK4JD) was to get an idea of the difference the amp made to an actual QSO. On bypass, with 1W, my signal was down some 20dB. So the amp was doing a fine job.

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Another Power Distribution Board

I decided it would be nice to have a power distribution board made of wood and sporting Anderson Power Pole connectors on the bench. The PCB and power poles were sourced from SotaBeams in the UK. This is what I came up with.

The connectors have been loaded onto a PCB, a nice piece of dark wood has a dado routered and the back panel is cut to size.

I drilled and cut the back panel to fit the PCB.

Cutting the back panel.

Next, the PCB was pushed into place.

The gaps between the connectors was filled with small off cuts of wood.

Next, I cut a second piece of timber to use as a back panel to the backing board. This will protect the PCB as current will be flowing through the solder joints.

I used a router as a crude milling machine to make a recess on a backing board to cover the PCB from the rear.

Once that had been done it was just a matter of screwing the two backing boards together and dropping the completed assembly into the base. This was also screwed into position. A coat of protective varnish was then applied.

All done.

My new power distribution board ready to be pressed into service.

Modifications to my power distribution board

My latest activation (Springbrook National Park) had one positive side affect: I modified my SOTABeams PowerPole PP-4 Way power distribution board enclosure. My original one didn’t provide sufficient protection for the four power pole plugs when in my back pack. Do I sourced a better plastic container, one that came with a removable shelf that fitted halfway down in the enclosure and a lid to enclose the plugs.

I installed the power pole plugs into position on the removable shelf.

When in use, the lid of the enclosure is in the open position.

The shelf fits nice and snugly in the enclosure.

When ready for transportation or storage, the lid clips on in position and the plugs are well protected. There is room for storage underneath the shelf: I might carry spare AA cells there.

A nice functional solution.

Building SOTABeams’ PowerPole PP-4 Way power distribution board

One of the challenges I was having while operating portable was making sure that my power polarity was correct. Fiddling around on a mountain peak with red and black connectors on a 7a/h gel cell is fraught with danger. And when I have two or more components to connect, well …

The answer I found on the SotaBeams web site (http://www.sotabeams.co.uk/).

I placed an order for their PowerPole PP-4 Way power distribution board.

A week or so later, a padded envelope arrived in my mail box.

The contents of the envelope.

Construction was easy as the kit is very simple. All that was needed was a soldering iron and some solder.

 

The power poles ready for soldering.

I ordered the kit only (without the enclosure), so I headed to the local supermarket and bought a cheap plastic sealable container that would do just fine. All I had to do was to cut out a piece wide enough from the lid for the connectors to stick through.

The PCB sits under the lid with the connectors sticking through. I secured it into place with four nuts and bolts.

The power supply connects to one set of power poles and the radio, atu and other items connect to the others. Simple.

Works like a charm. Will make a difference in a park or on a summit.