Beating the downturn with the miniHFPA2

Everyone’s been complaining lately about poor propagation when it comes to amateur radio. But I think I have found the answer to my situation, especially considering I run an essentially low power operation.
I ordered a miniHFPA2, a linear amplifier that is made for portable operation out in the field.
This little beauty is the 5th generation HF Packer amplifier that comes pre-assembled, tested and calibrated. All I had to do was to hook it up to my Yaesu FT-817, then feed the output through an SWR/Power meter and Antenna Tuning Unit to my long wire antenna.

All set up and ready to test on air.

I happened to notice, on checking SOTA Spotter, that VK2IO Gerard and VK2/G4OBK Phil would be activating three summits, VK2/IL-001, 002 and 005 on Thursday 8 February 2018.. This would present me with an excellent opportunity to try out the new amplifier.

I tuned up on 40m and responded to their calls. Gerard mentioned that he was receiving me well and gave me a signal report of 569. This was excellent news, given the marginal conditions. I worked all three summits as they were activated and couldn’t have been more pleased. You see, normally my 5W output wouldn’t have been up to it in current conditions.

So what is this little gem of an amp all about?

According to Virgil Stamps, who makes the amps, the aim of his project is to give your signal a boost so you can start making memorable contacts under marginal conditions. It certainly has lived up to that! The amp gives a clean, more powerful output signal from a QRP transceiver with a good balance between output power, physical size and weight. And what’s sure to excite any SOTA or WWFF operator, it can be powered by any battery such as a 7.2 AH gel cell or 4.2 AH LiFePo4 battery. The amplifier provides a full output of around 30-35W with as little as 9V DC, making it very tolerant for outdoor battery operation.

What makes this amp a little different is the heat sink that is secured to the top of the enclosure. It isn’t the more common type that features rows of serious fins; it is a flat metal plate of around 1mm in thickness. And it does the job it is intended to do very well indeed. It lends itself to outdoor use as it can easily be accommodated in any backpack, but care does need to be taken so as not to damage the toggle switches on the front panel.

I particularly like the slim heat sink that is secured to the top of the enclosure.

The amp comes complete with two low pass filter modules (60/40m and 30/20m) but mine came complete with additional ones for 160m, 80/75m, 17/15m, and 12/10m as well. These modules are inserted into place by unscrewing the left and/or right hand side panels of the enclosure. They slip in effortlessly, thanks to cleverly designed guide posts on the LPF boards. I think when I proceed on my next SOTA activation, I will decide beforehand what bands I will be operating on as I think unscrewing side panels in a hostile environment such as on a summit could be a little tricky. Virgil did send along a sealed package containing spare enclosure screws, heat sink compound, two spare MOSFETS and some other items. Great service and attention to detail.

At the time of ordering you need to specify what level of input power you will be using. This could range from 1 to 5W; I chose 5W. Output power is an easy 30W. Spurious products are -40dB or better at 35W, with harmonic content at -45dB or better at 35W.

If you’d like to read up on the specifications, visit the web site



First portable operation with the Packer 6m amplifier

I decided to take the bull by the horns and activate a SOTA summit on 6m only, using my newly-built Packer 6m 30W linear amplifier. The summit I chose was Tamborine Mountain, VK4/SE-059.

My rig this time was the Yaesu FT-817 and the antenna was a homebrew 6m dipole, strung up as a sloper.

The rig connected to the amp and the LDG antenna tuner. The battery is a 7a/h gel cell. The power cords are routed through a SotaBeams 4-Way distribution box.

As soon as I put out my first call, the game was on. In the space of a short 30 minutes I had made 15 contacts. Wonderful.

The action came thick and fast and the view was excellent.

One aim of the activation was to test the amp, especially how long the battery would last as it draws around 6A.

At the start of the activation my battery had 12.58V, and at the end, 12.49V. That’s pretty incredible, especially seeing I was operating almost continuously. Input power from the radio was 1W and output 30W.

Another test I carried out (with Peter VK4JD) was to get an idea of the difference the amp made to an actual QSO. On bypass, with 1W, my signal was down some 20dB. So the amp was doing a fine job.

Mt Beerburrum VK4/SE-112

Getting to Mt Beerburrum is easy: proceed along the Bruce Highway from Brisbane towards the Sunshine Coast for about 55km. Look for Exit 163, which will take you to the Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive. At approximately 4.8km take the Beerburrum Road turnoff and look out for the sign for Mt Beerburrum Lookout. There are a few car parks here, but rather continue along the gravel road for about 800m to the end, where there is ample car parking.

Park your car here and begin the walk to the summit.

The path to the summit is concrete all the way, but be aware, it is very steep. Classed as a Class 4 climb, the going is unrelenting all the way to the top. But there are many resting places along the way.

The concrete track may be only 700m long but it is deceptively challenging.

Allow an hour for the return journey and be sure to take frequent breaks.

This is a Class 4 climb.

It took us 40 minutes up and about 19 minutes down. And enjoy the views.

Take advantage of the many opportunities to take photos.

There is a small fire tower at the summit. As soon as you spot it you’ll know you are just about there.

The fire tower at the summit.

There is not much open space on the summit, especially if you want to erect a long wire antenna. I made use of a wooden pole to attach my squid pole to. Be sure to put out calls on 2m FM as well as there is excellent reception on the summit. I was able to talk to local hams easily from there.

There is also good phone reception from the summit.

Mt Beerburrum is part of the Glass House Mountain range and is within the Glass House Mountains National Park (VKFF-0200).

Matthew Finders mentioned this summit in his journal.

Climbing Mt Ngungun in the Glass House Mountains, QLD.

One of the most recognizable mountain groups in Queensland would have to be what is known as the Glass House Mountains. Named by Capt James Cook during his voyage of discovery, these remarkable geological formations are what remains from ancient volcanic activity.

Getting to Mt Ngungun, the northern most mountain in the group, is easy. Drive up the Bruce Highway and turnoff down Steve Irwin Way. Then follow the signs to the Glass House Mountains National Park. You’ll find a good place to park your car at the car park in Fullerton Road.

Plenty of parking available.

The track to the summit is well maintained, with good dirt surfaces and rock steps. It is a Grade 2 track all the way to the top. However, there is a short section where there is a warning to beware of cliff edges.

Signposting is good.

The walk up is interesting, through open forest with fern understory. There is also an interesting rock that features an overhang.

Looks much like a cave.

The walking track is excellent but care needs to be taken in wet weather as the rocks could be slippery.

The going is steep at times.

There are excellent views of the local area to make the journey up even more enjoyable. Photography is a must as there are good close-up views of nearby Mount Tibrogargan, Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah.

There is plenty of space on the summit but little shade. And there are lots of visitors; this is evidently a popular mountain for day excursions.

The small trees and rocks provided me with a good spot to erect my antenna and operate my low-powered radio station while enjoying spectacular views.

The round trip took about 2 hours, not counting time spent on the summit. The walking distance was around 2.8km.

Building SOTABeams’ PowerPole PP-4 Way power distribution board

One of the challenges I was having while operating portable was making sure that my power polarity was correct. Fiddling around on a mountain peak with red and black connectors on a 7a/h gel cell is fraught with danger. And when I have two or more components to connect, well …

The answer I found on the SotaBeams web site (

I placed an order for their PowerPole PP-4 Way power distribution board.

A week or so later, a padded envelope arrived in my mail box.

The contents of the envelope.

Construction was easy as the kit is very simple. All that was needed was a soldering iron and some solder.


The power poles ready for soldering.

I ordered the kit only (without the enclosure), so I headed to the local supermarket and bought a cheap plastic sealable container that would do just fine. All I had to do was to cut out a piece wide enough from the lid for the connectors to stick through.

The PCB sits under the lid with the connectors sticking through. I secured it into place with four nuts and bolts.

The power supply connects to one set of power poles and the radio, atu and other items connect to the others. Simple.

Works like a charm. Will make a difference in a park or on a summit.

Activating Mt Cotton VK4/SE-115

This was one summit I have wanted to activate for quite some time, partly due its proximity and partly due to the excellent Sirromet Winery nearby. So when Sunday 30 April dawned with beautiful clear skies, I knew it was time. My wife decided this would also make an excellent day out.

The drive to the base of the summit took about 40 minutes. We parked at the bottom in a designated car park and headed for the gate that heralded the beginning of the path up.

This is the beginning of the path up to the summit.

Fortunately the path up is sealed, which made walking up easier, even though it was rather steep at times.

It took us 22 minutes to walk up to the summit.

Once at the top it was simply a matter of seeking out the best operating position. This was important as there are a couple of communication towers there and I didn’t want interference.

The going was tough at times.

I found a suitable spot among a pile of rocks, so I erected the long wire antenna on my squid pole, and connected it up to my Elecraft KX1. It tuned up beautifully on 20m and 40m. For power I use six internal AA 1.5v batteries that give me between 1 and 2 watts output to play with.

It was quite comfortable, really.

I put out my first call on 20m and within seconds was answered by VK3CAT in Victoria. Not bad for 2 watts. I then switched to 40m (only 1 watt) and worked VK2NP, VK2BJT and VK4TJ.

I find the Pico Paddle a wonderful device to use with the KX1. It is magnetically held in place on the tin plate on my home brewed QSO board.

That was sufficient for the activation to count, so it was time to pack up and head off down and to lunch at Sirromet.

Activating Mt Warning, VK2/NR-001

January 11, 2017 had hardly got going when my son Garrett, his partner Vicky and I set out to activate Mt Warning, an ancient volcano that is said to be over 20 million years old. For this expedition, we hired accommodation in Byron Bay as this would cut down travelling time to the mountain. You see, we wanted to watch the sun rise from the summit.

Mt Warning as seen from Byron Bay.

Mt Warning as seen from Byron Bay.

We packed the car and headed for the base of the mountain at 2.45 am, arriving there at 4.11 am. I was a little surprised to see that we weren’t the only ones with that idea; there were around ten cars parked in the car park already!

An information board advised us that the hike would take between 4 and 6 hours to cover the 9 km track.

We also noticed that right from the start the going was uphill. I could feel this was going to be a most challenging activation. What was beginning to concern me was that I might have bitten off more than I could chew. I mean, Garrett is a professional sportsman and Vicky is an ultra-marathon and Iron Man competitor while I am a newly retired ‘senior’. Was I in the right company or what? At least there were four helicopter landing platforms, which gave some sort of comfort.

The first of four helicopter landing platforms.

The first of four helicopter landing platforms.

Sunrise was around 6 am, but we weren’t at the summit to view it. However, we were close enough and boy, was it spectacular!

This made the climb worthwhile.

This made the climb worthwhile.

We arrived at the hardest part of the climb; this involves a very challenging rock climb that was billed as a grade 5 climb – the hardest in the book. A heavy chain provides essential support all the way up; this part took us a good 20 minutes to complete.

This is a grade 5 climb.

This is a grade 5 climb.

After resting for a few minutes and taking in the view, I erected my squidpole and long wire antenna.

This antenna is prefect for my Elecraft KX1.

This antenna is prefect for my Elecraft KX1.

Then I began calling CQ. After my first contact (with ZL1BZY) the ants appeared. They seemed as fascinated with what was going on as the other mountain climbers.

Ants on my 7 a/h gel cell.

Ants on my 7 a/h gel cell.

I also found out that their bites were painful!

It's hard flicking them away while trying to operate the paddle.

My new QSO board in use. There are some more mods I need to make.

After making six contacts, it was time to pack up and head back down. The weather forecast was for heavy rain and we didn’t fancy the prospect of tackling the chains in the wet.

We passed some massive trees on the way down.

We passed some massive trees on the way down.

We arrived back at the base of the mountain at 10.24 am and headed for a wonderful cafe in the heart of the Wollumbin National Park for breakfast.

This was the hardest activation I have done so far. I still wonder how an old fella who passed us on the way up did so bare foot. He said he could feel the rocks better that way!

This activation bought home to me the absolute necessity of minimizing weight as much as possible. My back pack weighed in at a hefty 8 kg, and that was without our water bottles. The biggest culprit here was my gel cell, which is far too heavy. I think next time I will use six internal AA cells and sacrifice 3 Watts of power. Either that or I will invest in a  LiPo battery pack. I also took up items that I never used, like binoculars.

Having done most of my climbing in the ACT so far, I was inappropriately dressed. All other climbers were in shorts and singlets while I wore long pants and a long sleeve shirt; far too hot.

So there are always lessons to be learned, aren’t there?