Working Satellite SO-50

One aspect of amateur radio that I am enjoying lately is working the FM satellite SO-50. To do so I use my Boafeng GT-3TP dual band hand held and an Elk log periodic antenna that I have mounted on a camera tripod.

My basic satellite communications setup.

SO-50 carries several experiments, including a mode J FM amateur repeater experiment operating on 145.850 MHz uplink and 436.795 MHz downlink. The repeater is available to amateurs worldwide as power permits, using a 67.0 Hertz PL tone on the uplink, for on-demand activation. The repeater consists of a miniature VHF receiver with sensitivity of -124dBm, having an IF bandwidth of 15 KHz. The receive antenna is a 1/4 wave vertical mounted in the top corner of the spacecraft. The receive audio is filtered and conditioned then gated in the control electronics prior to feeding it to the 250mW UHF transmitter. The downlink antenna is a 1/4 wave mounted in the bottom corner of the spacecraft and canted at 45 degrees inward.

The Elk was loaned to me by Wal, VK4CBW, an avid satellite fan who lives down the road from me. The antenna is basically a held-held job but I do find it gets a bit heavy after a while, hence the tripod.

Today SO-50 was within range at 4.56pm, so I put out a call and was answered by Roy, VK4ZQ, from Nundah in Queensland. And although Roy isn’t that far from me, the satellite is. The apogee height is 665km, which means at its furthermost distance from the earth, it is 665km away. Not bad for a two-way FM contact.

 

Building a mounting board for hand-held radios

Aside

I have long wanted to build something to mount my hand-held radios on instead of having them balancing on my workbench shelf, where they are easily knocked over. I have seen others keeping them mounted in their chargers, but after consulting with the amateur radio community decided this wasn’t such a good idea.

So it was back to my workshop to construct a simple bracket-like mounting board out of wood that I happened to have among my store of timber. I found I had a nice piece of pine as well as a sheet of 6.4mm ply wood that would do just fine. So it was out with my router, to which I inserted a 6.4mm bit to cut a dado. The ply would fit nicely into this, after glue had been applied, of course.

Once that was done I applied some oak refinishing oil, which added a nice touch to the finished product.

 

There is more than enough room for four radios.

All my radios have the belt clips installed, which is handy as they can now clip nicely and securely to the board.