The John Moyle Field Day 2018: Another successful field day.

Another Field Day success. This time my main goal was to rake up a few contacts during the John Moyle Field Day, operating from Mt Coot-tha in Brisbane with my FT-817 and Buddistick antenna. But this time, instead of squeezing the most out of 5W, I hooked up my new HF Packer miniHFPA2 Edition linear amp that puts out a massive 30W. And the beauty of this is that I would only need my 7 A/H gel cell to power it.

My set up for the day, from left: Yaesu FT-817, HF Packer miniHFPA2 amp, LDG-Z100Plus tuner. Behind: Yaesu FT-70D, Sotabeams powwerpole distribution box on top of 7 A/H gel cell.

I mounted my Buddistick antenna to a BBQ grill behind the operating bench that looked as though it had seen better days. Fortunately the G-clamp just fitted.

The Buddistick did a good job and was easy to erect. I chose it over a dipole as there was no ready method to secure my squid pole close to the operating bench.

Well, at the start of my 40 minute activation, my battery showed 12.69 V and at the end, 12.60 V. And that was after continuous SSB work on 40m. So 9 QSOs later, I was content to pack things up and head for home.


Trends in Amateur Radio

It’s always been accepted that one of the attractions of amateur radio was that it involved the building of kits; if you needed (or wanted) a better or more specific transmitter, receiver or transceiver but couldn’t afford to purchase one from your local retailer, you bought one in kit form and built it yourself.
Kits were ordered over the phone and posted to you. Some were better than others but all had potential risks involved, such as the odd missing component.

The Elecraft KX1 kit came professionally packed with a great instruction manual.

This kit from Virgil Stamps at is a good example of a well-produced kit that involves soldering all the components into place in the PCB.

And it wasn’t only on the electronics front that you could heat up your soldering iron and get busy; making a suitable antenna was also a huge part of the hobby.

My homebrew 6m dipole strung up and ready for action.

Baluns are also popular construction projects with homebrewers.

I wound the entire length of coax on a piece of PVC piping I had in my workshop.

Of course, you didn’t have to stick with kits if you needed to construct a radio; you could always build one from scratch with components you happened to have in your proverbial junk box.

I built this regenerative receiver using what I happened to have on hand at the time.

Test equipment is also easy to build from kits.

QRPometer on the left, Hendricks dummy load/power meter on the right.

I have noticed a trend beginning to appear in the world of amateur radio, and that’s a swing away from ‘melting solder’. I first noticed this with the advent of the Elecraft KX3 a few years ago. For the first time this world leader in kit production began marketing a rig that only required mechanical construction; all the electronics came pre-manufactured and only needed slotting into place in the enclosure, which needed first to be put together by the ham. This was due to the high number of surface mount components present.

And now Virgil Stamps, proprietor of the beautifully designed and manufactured HF linear amplifier that is aimed at the SOTA and WWFF fraternity ( has gone this route with the launching of his latest offering, the HFPacker Amp MiniHFPA2. By all accounts it looks like this new trend in amateur radio is here to stay, but as long as it helps get more people on air, that’s sure to be a good thing.

Mt Beerburrum VK4/SE-112

Getting to Mt Beerburrum is easy: proceed along the Bruce Highway from Brisbane towards the Sunshine Coast for about 55km. Look for Exit 163, which will take you to the Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive. At approximately 4.8km take the Beerburrum Road turnoff and look out for the sign for Mt Beerburrum Lookout. There are a few car parks here, but rather continue along the gravel road for about 800m to the end, where there is ample car parking.

Park your car here and begin the walk to the summit.

The path to the summit is concrete all the way, but be aware, it is very steep. Classed as a Class 4 climb, the going is unrelenting all the way to the top. But there are many resting places along the way.

The concrete track may be only 700m long but it is deceptively challenging.

Allow an hour for the return journey and be sure to take frequent breaks.

This is a Class 4 climb.

It took us 40 minutes up and about 19 minutes down. And enjoy the views.

Take advantage of the many opportunities to take photos.

There is a small fire tower at the summit. As soon as you spot it you’ll know you are just about there.

The fire tower at the summit.

There is not much open space on the summit, especially if you want to erect a long wire antenna. I made use of a wooden pole to attach my squid pole to. Be sure to put out calls on 2m FM as well as there is excellent reception on the summit. I was able to talk to local hams easily from there.

There is also good phone reception from the summit.

Mt Beerburrum is part of the Glass House Mountain range and is within the Glass House Mountains National Park (VKFF-0200).

Matthew Finders mentioned this summit in his journal.

QRP Hours contest

Sunday 22nd October was a good day for QRP in VK-Land. And even thougth HF conditions haven’t been good at all (especially according to some), I had success and a lot of fun by taking part in this short contest run by the CW Operators’ QRP Club Inc.

This year the contest was restricted to the 40m band and consisted of two sections: the first hour CW and the second Phone. I took part in the CW section only.

The rig I used was my trust Elecraft KX1, this time with 12v gel cell power as I didn’t have to worry about weight: I was to operate from the back deck of my home. The antenna was the Buddistick that I attached to the hand railing of the deck by means of my new Buddistick G-clamp. My key was the Pico Paddle. Power output was 3W.

My set up for the contest. All ready to go.

Tuning up the antenna on 40m was not easy. I couldn’t get a match at all with my Hendricks BLT Tuner, so I hauled out my LDG auto tuner, which gave me a 1.9:1 reading, which was the best I got. QRP is all about compromise, so I went with that.

The Buddistick mounted to the railing with my new G-Clamp.

I do think that the proximity of metal guttering didn’t help, but I had to make do with the situation I found myself in. At least there was some good height, facing south – which would be good for VK1 and VK2 contacts.

Nice height even though I needed to angle the whip.

Noise levels were high on the band but nevertheless, I was able to work VK2IG, VJ2GAZ, VK2FGBR, VK1DA, VK2JDR and VK2IO.

Next time I’ll try a long wire antenna.

Windcamp proves its worth in Samford CP activation

Today I activated Samford Conservation Park VKFF-1639 once more in an attempt to secure four contacts to bring my total to ten. It would also be the first time I would use my new Windcamp LiPo battery.
Setting up my long wire antenna was interesting: I needed a heavy tree branch to act as an end support. The far end was supported by my squid pole.

It’s all about improvisation.

At the start of the activation, my internal Windcamp LiPo was putting out 12V which allowed me to operate at a full 5W. By the time I had made four contacts, I had been operating solidly for an hour and seven minutes. The voltage on the display was now reading 11.8V.

I am more than happy with that.

Activating Mt Cotton VK4/SE-115

This was one summit I have wanted to activate for quite some time, partly due its proximity and partly due to the excellent Sirromet Winery nearby. So when Sunday 30 April dawned with beautiful clear skies, I knew it was time. My wife decided this would also make an excellent day out.

The drive to the base of the summit took about 40 minutes. We parked at the bottom in a designated car park and headed for the gate that heralded the beginning of the path up.

This is the beginning of the path up to the summit.

Fortunately the path up is sealed, which made walking up easier, even though it was rather steep at times.

It took us 22 minutes to walk up to the summit.

Once at the top it was simply a matter of seeking out the best operating position. This was important as there are a couple of communication towers there and I didn’t want interference.

The going was tough at times.

I found a suitable spot among a pile of rocks, so I erected the long wire antenna on my squid pole, and connected it up to my Elecraft KX1. It tuned up beautifully on 20m and 40m. For power I use six internal AA 1.5v batteries that give me between 1 and 2 watts output to play with.

It was quite comfortable, really.

I put out my first call on 20m and within seconds was answered by VK3CAT in Victoria. Not bad for 2 watts. I then switched to 40m (only 1 watt) and worked VK2NP, VK2BJT and VK4TJ.

I find the Pico Paddle a wonderful device to use with the KX1. It is magnetically held in place on the tin plate on my home brewed QSO board.

That was sufficient for the activation to count, so it was time to pack up and head off down and to lunch at Sirromet.

Activating Fort Lytton, VKFF-0179

I decided to activate Fort Lytton National Park ¬†on Sunday 23 April 2017 for two reasons: firstly it has never been activated before and secondly, it’s considered to be the birth place of Queensland’s military history.


The above picture is of the Fort’s parade ground.

This coastal fortress served as Brisbane’s primary defences from 1881 until 1965. It was even used during WW11, when some 89 US submarines were docked here for repairs during the war.

There is an interesting museum there now, including a good display of military radio’s, which I particularly liked.


I was fortunate in finding an excellent operating position, right alongside the river under a gazebo. The picnic bench was just perfect and it was unoccupied.


Being a first activation meant that I was able to make a quick ten contacts, on both SSB as well as CW. The rig I used was my FT-817 that tuned an end-fed long wire by means of an LDG auto tuner. My key was my new pico paddle, which worked beautifully.

The weather was perfect, the exhibits were wonderful and the activation was a success. Will need to revisit this site again sometime.