Mt Beerburrum VK4/SE-112

Getting to Mt Beerburrum is easy: proceed along the Bruce Highway from Brisbane towards the Sunshine Coast for about 55km. Look for Exit 163, which will take you to the Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive. At approximately 4.8km take the Beerburrum Road turnoff and look out for the sign for Mt Beerburrum Lookout. There are a few car parks here, but rather continue along the gravel road for about 800m to the end, where there is ample car parking.

Park your car here and begin the walk to the summit.

The path to the summit is concrete all the way, but be aware, it is very steep. Classed as a Class 4 climb, the going is unrelenting all the way to the top. But there are many resting places along the way.

The concrete track may be only 700m long but it is deceptively challenging.

Allow an hour for the return journey and be sure to take frequent breaks.

This is a Class 4 climb.

It took us 40 minutes up and about 19 minutes down. And enjoy the views.

Take advantage of the many opportunities to take photos.

There is a small fire tower at the summit. As soon as you spot it you’ll know you are just about there.

The fire tower at the summit.

There is not much open space on the summit, especially if you want to erect a long wire antenna. I made use of a wooden pole to attach my squid pole to. Be sure to put out calls on 2m FM as well as there is excellent reception on the summit. I was able to talk to local hams easily from there.

There is also good phone reception from the summit.

Mt Beerburrum is part of the Glass House Mountain range and is within the Glass House Mountains National Park (VKFF-0200).

Matthew Finders mentioned this summit in his journal.

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Climbing Mt Ngungun in the Glass House Mountains, QLD.

One of the most recognizable mountain groups in Queensland would have to be what is known as the Glass House Mountains. Named by Capt James Cook during his voyage of discovery, these remarkable geological formations are what remains from ancient volcanic activity.

Getting to Mt Ngungun, the northern most mountain in the group, is easy. Drive up the Bruce Highway and turnoff down Steve Irwin Way. Then follow the signs to the Glass House Mountains National Park. You’ll find a good place to park your car at the car park in Fullerton Road.

Plenty of parking available.

The track to the summit is well maintained, with good dirt surfaces and rock steps. It is a Grade 2 track all the way to the top. However, there is a short section where there is a warning to beware of cliff edges.

Signposting is good.

The walk up is interesting, through open forest with fern understory. There is also an interesting rock that features an overhang.

Looks much like a cave.

The walking track is excellent but care needs to be taken in wet weather as the rocks could be slippery.

The going is steep at times.

There are excellent views of the local area to make the journey up even more enjoyable. Photography is a must as there are good close-up views of nearby Mount Tibrogargan, Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah.

There is plenty of space on the summit but little shade. And there are lots of visitors; this is evidently a popular mountain for day excursions.

The small trees and rocks provided me with a good spot to erect my antenna and operate my low-powered radio station while enjoying spectacular views.

The round trip took about 2 hours, not counting time spent on the summit. The walking distance was around 2.8km.

QRP Hours contest

Sunday 22nd October was a good day for QRP in VK-Land. And even thougth HF conditions haven’t been good at all (especially according to some), I had success and a lot of fun by taking part in this short contest run by the CW Operators’ QRP Club Inc.

This year the contest was restricted to the 40m band and consisted of two sections: the first hour CW and the second Phone. I took part in the CW section only.

The rig I used was my trust Elecraft KX1, this time with 12v gel cell power as I didn’t have to worry about weight: I was to operate from the back deck of my home. The antenna was the Buddistick that I attached to the hand railing of the deck by means of my new Buddistick G-clamp. My key was the Pico Paddle. Power output was 3W.

My set up for the contest. All ready to go.

Tuning up the antenna on 40m was not easy. I couldn’t get a match at all with my Hendricks BLT Tuner, so I hauled out my LDG auto tuner, which gave me a 1.9:1 reading, which was the best I got. QRP is all about compromise, so I went with that.

The Buddistick mounted to the railing with my new G-Clamp.

I do think that the proximity of metal guttering didn’t help, but I had to make do with the situation I found myself in. At least there was some good height, facing south – which would be good for VK1 and VK2 contacts.

Nice height even though I needed to angle the whip.

Noise levels were high on the band but nevertheless, I was able to work VK2IG, VJ2GAZ, VK2FGBR, VK1DA, VK2JDR and VK2IO.

Next time I’ll try a long wire antenna.

Windcamp proves its worth in Samford CP activation

Today I activated Samford Conservation Park VKFF-1639 once more in an attempt to secure four contacts to bring my total to ten. It would also be the first time I would use my new Windcamp LiPo battery.
Setting up my long wire antenna was interesting: I needed a heavy tree branch to act as an end support. The far end was supported by my squid pole.

It’s all about improvisation.

At the start of the activation, my internal Windcamp LiPo was putting out 12V which allowed me to operate at a full 5W. By the time I had made four contacts, I had been operating solidly for an hour and seven minutes. The voltage on the display was now reading 11.8V.

I am more than happy with that.

New battery power for my FT-817

I have long wanted/needed to upgrade my battery power for my Yaesu FT-817. The prompt came when the internal battery died. My choice was the kit put out by Windcamp; a 3000mAh internal LiPo battery and new battery compartment lid for the radio that comes fitted with a PCB and charging circuitry that allows the supplied mains charger to charge the battery while inside the radio.

The parcel arrived from China beautifully packed. The battery and the new replacement lid came packaged in very nice plastic cases, which, together with the instructions and charger, all fitted into a compact cardboard box for shipping.

The contents of the parcel.

After extracting the individual components from their packaging, it was time to think about installing the battery into the radio.

It is a tight fit but the components plugged together as intended. Note the PCB on the underside of the new lid.

When the battery and associated wiring was all nice and snugly fitted, I popped the lid closed and got ready to charge the new LiPo battery.

The new lid in place and ready for charging.

The charger has a double-coloured LED to indicate the state of the charge: red for charging and green for a completed charge. The initial charge takes around 5 hours to accomplish.

According to the supplied documentation, the rated voltage of the battery is 11.1V, with the output voltage range stated as between 9 and 12.6V. The maximum output current is 4A.

Now to test it in the field.

Another Power Distribution Board

I decided it would be nice to have a power distribution board made of wood and sporting Anderson Power Pole connectors on the bench. The PCB and power poles were sourced from SotaBeams in the UK. This is what I came up with.

The connectors have been loaded onto a PCB, a nice piece of dark wood has a dado routered and the back panel is cut to size.

I drilled and cut the back panel to fit the PCB.

Cutting the back panel.

Next, the PCB was pushed into place.

The gaps between the connectors was filled with small off cuts of wood.

Next, I cut a second piece of timber to use as a back panel to the backing board. This will protect the PCB as current will be flowing through the solder joints.

I used a router as a crude milling machine to make a recess on a backing board to cover the PCB from the rear.

Once that had been done it was just a matter of screwing the two backing boards together and dropping the completed assembly into the base. This was also screwed into position. A coat of protective varnish was then applied.

All done.

My new power distribution board ready to be pressed into service.

Working F0-29

Now that I have worked an FM satellite (in my case SO-50) the next challenge was to try a SSB satellite.

The basics would be the same I figured, except I would need to use my Yaesu FT-817. In fact, all I needed to do was to switch rigs and take into account that I would be needing to run to 817 off my 7 a/h SLAB, which I would need to slip into a spare camera bag so I could carry it over one shoulder.

The battery is in a camera bag hanging on my left side, and the FT-817 is slung around my neck (I knew the strap would come in handy some day).

So that I could work the satellite single handed out in the field without the aid of computer software, this is what I did:

  1. Set the rig into split mode
  2. Set VFO A to 145.960. This is the uplink.
  3. Set VFO B to 435.840. This is the down link
  4. Make sure the antenna connection is set to the front connector on the radio
  5. Keep the radio set to VFO B

When I saw the satellite is within range (using Satellite Explorer on my PC), I went outside and pointed the antenna into the rough direction of the satellite’s approach. This was roughly north. Then I put out a call (the radio switches to VFO A automatically when the PTT is activated but returns to VFO B when it is released. Then I immediately began tuning down the band to listen for replies.

Sure enough, I heard Wal VK4CBW, George VK2WEL and Geoff VK2ZAZ. I had a very satisfying QSO with them, but it was challenging having to continually alter the receive frequency by hand during the receive cycle while altering the direction of the antenna to take into account changes to direction as well as height, all at the same time.

Next is to think about improving my operating setup, perhaps with some form of automatic tracking capability.